3 Tips for Better Stick Rebound

3 Tips For Better Stick Rebound

 

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61 comments on “3 Tips for Better Stick Rebound

  1. Andrew says:

    Great lesson on drums, and physics ;-)

    Thank you,

    Andrew

  2. Tony says:

    This is what Freddy Gruber taught. He would say “let the stick fall don’t muscle it”
    The beard man……….?

  3. Marco says:

    Great!! Thank you very very much, I find it extremely well done.
    Marco

  4. Lonnie says:

    That’s always one thing that sets me back. Not letting the sticks do the work. I really appreciate you bringing this to my attention. Honestly you have opened my eyes. Thank you so much Stephen. I know this will help me immensely!!

  5. Bruce says:

    Great tips Stephen. I struggle with this myself. Thanks so much for this!
    -Bruce

  6. Martin Bouissa says:

    When it comes to drags, the switch from let it rebound to stop the stick (but not to hard ) it is also a headache for me. Thanks again for these free lessons/eyeopeners.

  7. Alain Poudrier says:

    I just love the way you explain the Mohler technique Stephen ! I have heard this explained many times before and have attempted to look into this approach for a while now , but you have just sold me on the idea of taking a few months to develop this in my playing.
    Many thanks my friend!

  8. John Thurkett says:

    Great teaching, understandable and very passionate.

  9. Frank Jones says:

    Thank You for a great explanation, its 12 midnight and I’m grabbing my pad and sticks now!!

  10. Dave Hylka says:

    Great lesson. My left hand sucks. I feel like no matter how much I practice it will never “catch up” to the right.
    Does it make sense to JUST practice left hand. I think I may duct tape my right behind my back for a few months
    and see. You Rock Bro, love the beard and I’ll put up with the knee caps.

    • Stephen says:

      Prioritize your left. Work on it first, play the exercises left hand lead, and play each exercise 2-3 times for every one you play on your right hand. If you really want a kick in the pants, start playing open handed and making your left hand lead the groove on the hats. Frustrating but rewarding. If you think about it, in a basic rock groove with 2 and 4 on the snare, our left hand literally hits the drum 1 time for every 4 hits on the right. It’s just natural that your right will be stronger.

  11. Bruce says:

    Stephen, this was a truly illuminating lesson – thank you! When I heard you say, “You’ve got understand how much rebound is there” I sat down at my set and found out that my snare tuning was really limiting rebound. I tightened it up a bit and it made a big difference. Now it’s time to reassess the tuning of my entire set. Single stoke rolls on floor toms have always been a problem for me – any suggestions as to technique or tuning there?

    • Stephen says:

      You will need to adjust your technique depending on the “give” of a particular drum. I would simply practice on that drum and adjust the technique as needed. Do this for each surface and then begin trying to transition smoothly from one to the other, adjusting your technique for each surface as you go. Go slowly. It will take a while but the payoff is huge.

  12. Huw Rees says:

    Hey Stephen that was great to reinforce that i’m teaching my pupils correctly! I’ve been doing this with my pupils for about 5 years, and with myself before that and on an ongoing constant basis! Great stuff man. Thanks

  13. DJ.Spinach says:

    Hi Stephen I been studying this ;) when you demontrated Moeller stroke you actually used your fingers to create a rebound. In Moeller the kick comes from the elbow and the pinkie must stay on the stick all the time because if you take it off it alliws the wrist to take over. Freddie Gruber !!!

    • Stephen says:

      Hey D.J…great discussion. Let me first say, this isn’t a lesson on Moeller so my demonstration of it was quick. I have an hour long lesson on just that stroke on the website. In it, you see me break it out as you typically see others break it out. The problem is, when the Moeller is isolated we exaggerate the motion to teach it. Once we put it in to practice, the motion must become reduced. Rarely is that reduction of motion focused on so many students are left thinking there needs to be a massive elbow kick to perform this motion. In other words, the elbow is still involved and helping in the stroke, but it is not the focal point. It’s just part of the whip…and it’s a very easy visual element for us teachers to point to when explaining things. When I’m playing in the video, the elbow is most definitely involved. But for economy of motion, the “kick” is reduced until it’s almost not noticeable. You will see this in most players unless they are teaching a lesson on the basics of the Moeller stroke. And that stroke is actually initiated as far up as the shoulder. There is no way for your elbow to be involved unless the shoulder initiates the kick. It is very similar to the one inch punch performed by a professional fighter. You barely see them move. But that entire one inch motion is initiated in the hips and core. That’s where the power comes from. They’ve just reduced the motion to such a small size that it’s impossible to pick out the various components at full speed. The same thing happens with Moeller. And I will disagree with you (respectfully of course)…whether my pinkie comes off the stick or not, the motion is the same. The arm throws the stick, there is a slight hiccup in the wrist at the end, and the rebound will happen without the further involvement of the wrist or fingers. In my study, whether the fingers remain on the stick or not, the rebound will still happen. The fingers and wrist are involved once higher speeds are performed to help control the velocity of the rebound. In this video, my fingers come off to show exactly where the rebound is happening…at the fulcrum point…because this video is about rebound, not the Moeller stroke. Rarely is a Moeller stroke performed in isolation on the kit. It almost always involves other components of finger control, the Free Stroke, push pull, etc. They all work together like a machine. But again, this isn’t a lesson on the Moeller which is why I didn’t spend any time breaking that out. It’s a lesson on the role of rebound in your playing. Rebound happens with ANY stroke we perform on the kit if we will allow that rebound.

      Sorry for the long explanation. This is why I have rarely posted YT clips on in depth topics. It’s hard to give a concise look at such a deep topic in a short YT video. Which is why I’ve chosen to break some of these questions up into their individual components. And Freddie Gruber is a legend ;^)

      Great discussion!

  14. Tony says:

    Great technique! Makes a lot of sense! I’m rebounding from a wrist injury. Thanks!

  15. Greg Elio says:

    Great lesson Steve. When I was taught back in the 60’s how to hold sticks I was thought I had to hold stick tight between the index finger and thumb and no one ever corrected me. For years I could never get a lot of speed. It was all wrist. It drove me nuts. Well finally I started seeing lessons similar to this one and wow what a difference it made in my playing especially speed and of coarse less work. At 68 yrs old this definitely makes it easier to play. After all drums are surely a physical experience. I really enjoy watching your lessons Stephen your a great teacher.

    • Stephen says:

      That’s the way I learned as well Greg. I think it had more to do with me being 14 and not wanting to focus on “boring” technique. I had fantastic teachers, so I’ve always put it off as me being young and rushing through things. This is a completely different way of playing and as you pointed out, makes it a joy to play.

  16. Jon Pryor says:

    One of the most significant thins I got from my early time with Drumeo was the grip change. Finding the balance point and moving my grip forward to utilize the stick. My speed increased exponentially immediately. My control increased. I recognized that virtually everything I’d been doing up to that point consisted of working WAY TOO HARD! Let the gear do the work! The jazz drummers I’m into now obviously rely heavily on that. It’s what makes their playing appear so effortless, seamless and fluid. IT IS FLUID! The sticks and the heads are doing the work. The drummer is basically steering around the kit.

  17. Stan says:

    Hey Stephen,

    What I found very cool is how fast and with different results in sound the three different grips you did made. It would be nice to see each of those for a few bars to study just how they differ.

    As usual great presentation

    Best

    • Stephen says:

      It really is fascinating the different tones you can get just from how you grip the stick. I have in depth lessons on all of those grips on the website. So glad the lesson helped Stan!

  18. Steven says:

    Your lessons are great. But it always sounds like you are shouting, so it’s hard for me to listen. What if you just talked naturally at a normal volume?
    I think you would make it easier to connect with you.
    But thanks for the useful lesson.

  19. Lawrence Perry says:

    Thermo = Heat. Thermodynamically striking a surface also emits heat. I know a totally irrelevant factoid relative to this discussion but it is one of the energies transferred during a strike.
    More importantly I sho ain’t makin no heat when I strike the drum in anything more than single strokes. Like you demonstrated the bounce within a roll. Mine would lack power and volume but mos def executed. What Can I do?

  20. Ronald Cote says:

    Thank you for all you do Stephen. Benny Greb, Bruce Becker, Freddy Gruber, Gordy Knudson, they all say “Don’t CHOKE the rebound. The same thing can be said when we over-muffle a drum.

  21. Floyd Humphrey says:

    Hi Stephen,
    Great tips, and now I know why I keep getting cramps in my fingers whenever I play. I am too rigid with my strokes. A huge THANK YOU.
    Floyd

  22. Sharin says:

    Wow! So helpful: 1) know the energy is there, 2) allow the energy to happen, 3) participate with the energy. You changed my day in an area where I struggled greatly. Thank you!

  23. I’ve seen so many people complaining of wrist injuries from not letting the stick rebound. Great video.
    And a good reminder – most exercises are good, but it’s about the detail in how you do them .

  24. Stephen,
    Just a quick note (and maybe some humor) from an old drummer (55 years of playing) – the grip technique you were discussing was taught to me (at the tender age of 19) by my college Fencing instructor. His concept for holding the Foil was “Imagine you’re holding a small, delicate, live bird. Apply just enough pressure so that it does not fly away.” It took a couple of weeks for me to relax while holding “a sword!”against an opponent and eventually my results in matches benefitted from this technique. Somehow, lucky for me, this transferred to holding drumsticks, not sure I ever really thought about, just happened. Now at 66 both wrists and elbows are still fine, most likely due to my Fencing instructor. The shoulders are problems … wait, that’s from Hockey injuries, the ankles and a knee … Basketball stupidity and my hearing (what?) … every bassist who sat on my left.
    Thoroughly enjoy listening to your insights, Thanks.

  25. Jacob says:

    Thanks for this lesson it’s just what I needed. I’ve been struggling with doubles and whether the second stroke of a double should be all rebound (as it is I’m playing it like 2 consecutive single strokes with that hand)

  26. Bill Matthews says:

    Great lesson, Stephen. Really enjoyed it. However, I’m having a problem with the sticks themselves. I’m coming back into drumming after a 34 year “hiatus”. I bought a new pair of the sticks I used to play and their balance is WAAAYYY out of whack for me. I still have my sticks from 35 years ago and I can’t get anywhere near the bounce and rebound out of the new sticks as I still can with my old sticks (they’re still in fairly good condition, just the nylon tips are wearing down). I’m an old-style rudimental swing drummer who’s uses traditional grip and it seems to me sticks today are weighted for matched grip rock drumming and are front weighted, so they don’t have the rebound sticks used to. Do you have any recommendations on the subject? Thank you so much

    • Stephen says:

      Look at Vic Firth’s jazz series. You may find something there that you like. I would suggest going to a music store and trying out as many different kinds as you can to find the ones you like. Then, just order those from now on.

  27. Bill Matthews says:

    Great lesson, Stephen. Really enjoyed it. However, I’m having a problem with the sticks themselves. I’m coming back into drumming after a 34 year “hiatus”. I bought a new pair of the sticks I used to play and their balance is WAAAYYY out of whack for me. I still have my sticks from 35 years ago and I can’t get anywhere near the bounce and rebound out of the new sticks as I still can with my old sticks (they’re still in fairly good condition, just the nylon tips are wearing down). I’m an old-style rudimental swing drummer who’s uses traditional grip and it seems to me sticks today are weighted for matched grip rock drumming and are front weighted, so they don’t have the rebound sticks used to. Do you have any recommendations on the subject? Thank you so much

  28. Steve is this how good drummers can play fast 16 or 32 etc rolls? Is like 2/3s of the roll just rebound? If so one would have to learn to really work with and maybe control that rebound. Easy fast rolls – bliss!

  29. Pefi says:

    Good lesson!
    it is very difficult for me to change the technique but your lessons encourage me!Pefi!

  30. Gilberto Cruz says:

    Stephen, nice work again! Thanks! It’s very helpful!

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