What would you do?

Drum Lessons Forums DBD Member Lesson Discussion What would you do?

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
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  • #29880
    Marcus
    Moderator

    You have 45 minutes a day to develop yourself as a player….what will you focus on and how will you go about it?  What is your reasoning for focusing on those things in that way?  I will go first.

    1.  Technique – 10 minutes – find a (meaning only one) rudiment or technique issue and work it solid for 10 minutes.  At  first  it might be just doing it to get it in my limbs and mind…mechanics….later it would be to move it around the kit….after that to make  it musical.

    2.  Groove – 20  minutes – take  beats and make them feel great. Focus on the nuances that make them work….record  and listen back during drive time.

    3.  Music – 15 – whatever songs I am learning,  I would either  run through them if there are no  trouble spots, or focus exclusively on the trouble  spots.

    Why these areas and why this breakdown?

    1.  Technique should always be improving in my book.  It translates to everything else  I  do.  So it has to  get some love every day.

    2.   You have to groove….groove  is king.  If I can’t make it groove, it just doesn’t matter.

    3. I am constantly preparing for the next gig.  Songs have to  be learned to the point of being on automatic.  So  I smooth the rough spots and rehearse them until they are burned into my brain.   Nothing  worse than showing up on the gig and feeling unprepared.

    What about you?  How would you approach it?

     

     

     

    #29898
    Charles
    Participant

    My approach is not much different.  I have a few technique things going (doubles and bass drum speed), plus I’m specifically working through some lesson material (Stephen’s lessons always seem to come back to limb independence, or working with X-lets, even if they are nominally about something else, so I’m working through some of that).  I use grooves for warm up, then if I have time I work on songs I’m having trouble with.

    #29916
    Robert
    Participant

    I’m similar.  I tend to plan 1 hour of work time.  I carve it out (approximately) to 20 minutes on rudiments, during which I also focus on hand technique; 20 minutes on groove, which may include specific grooves for songs I’m learning, and 20 minutes on bass drum control and new stickings I’m trying to learn.  Of course there are those sessions where I have to play a new song in a few days and just need to focus on that.  I keep a practice pad and sticks in my car so I can work on basic sticking patterns and some hand foot independence by doing ostinatos with my feet.  The reason for that is due to the limited kit time I have.  If I can work some basic mechanics out while sitting in my car at lunch time etc…, I can be more productive when I hit the kit.

    #29961
    Stephen
    Keymaster

    This would be similar to what I would do if I only had that amount of time.

    The other option for me would be to do a 5 minute warm up, 10 minute technique, and then devote the rest of the time to one specific topic…incorporating the Big 7 in to that topic at varying intervals: Groove, Timing, Technique, Flow, Melody, Dynamics, & Articulation. Not necessarily in that order. Using those 7 allows me to not feel so overwhelmed as all of those need to appear in ANYTHING we play.

    Playing to music is so important though. If I’m being honest, that’s one that I skip in my practice time. Which is not a big deal when I’m gigging consistently (like I am now) but becomes a HUGE issue when I have periods where I don’t play out much for whatever reason.

    #29978
    Marcus
    Moderator

    Great point on the Big 7.  That is what makes it music!

  • Author
    Posts
  • #29880

    Marcus
    Moderator
    • Offline

    You have 45 minutes a day to develop yourself as a player….what will you focus on and how will you go about it?  What is your reasoning for focusing on those things in that way?  I will go first.

    1.  Technique – 10 minutes – find a (meaning only one) rudiment or technique issue and work it solid for 10 minutes.  At  first  it might be just doing it to get it in my limbs and mind…mechanics….later it would be to move it around the kit….after that to make  it musical.

    2.  Groove – 20  minutes – take  beats and make them feel great. Focus on the nuances that make them work….record  and listen back during drive time.

    3.  Music – 15 – whatever songs I am learning,  I would either  run through them if there are no  trouble spots, or focus exclusively on the trouble  spots.

    Why these areas and why this breakdown?

    1.  Technique should always be improving in my book.  It translates to everything else  I  do.  So it has to  get some love every day.

    2.   You have to groove….groove  is king.  If I can’t make it groove, it just doesn’t matter.

    3. I am constantly preparing for the next gig.  Songs have to  be learned to the point of being on automatic.  So  I smooth the rough spots and rehearse them until they are burned into my brain.   Nothing  worse than showing up on the gig and feeling unprepared.

    What about you?  How would you approach it?

     

     

     

    #29898

    Charles
    Participant
    • Offline

    My approach is not much different.  I have a few technique things going (doubles and bass drum speed), plus I’m specifically working through some lesson material (Stephen’s lessons always seem to come back to limb independence, or working with X-lets, even if they are nominally about something else, so I’m working through some of that).  I use grooves for warm up, then if I have time I work on songs I’m having trouble with.

    #29916

    Robert
    Participant
    • Offline

    I’m similar.  I tend to plan 1 hour of work time.  I carve it out (approximately) to 20 minutes on rudiments, during which I also focus on hand technique; 20 minutes on groove, which may include specific grooves for songs I’m learning, and 20 minutes on bass drum control and new stickings I’m trying to learn.  Of course there are those sessions where I have to play a new song in a few days and just need to focus on that.  I keep a practice pad and sticks in my car so I can work on basic sticking patterns and some hand foot independence by doing ostinatos with my feet.  The reason for that is due to the limited kit time I have.  If I can work some basic mechanics out while sitting in my car at lunch time etc…, I can be more productive when I hit the kit.

    #29961

    Stephen
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    This would be similar to what I would do if I only had that amount of time.

    The other option for me would be to do a 5 minute warm up, 10 minute technique, and then devote the rest of the time to one specific topic…incorporating the Big 7 in to that topic at varying intervals: Groove, Timing, Technique, Flow, Melody, Dynamics, & Articulation. Not necessarily in that order. Using those 7 allows me to not feel so overwhelmed as all of those need to appear in ANYTHING we play.

    Playing to music is so important though. If I’m being honest, that’s one that I skip in my practice time. Which is not a big deal when I’m gigging consistently (like I am now) but becomes a HUGE issue when I have periods where I don’t play out much for whatever reason.

    #29978

    Marcus
    Moderator
    • Offline

    Great point on the Big 7.  That is what makes it music!

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