hybrid kit?

Drum Lessons Forums Gear Talk hybrid kit?

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #38124
    Mike
    Participant

    Hi:

    I’m a n00b, loving SDS, and diligently and patiently practicing on an old e-kit left behind by a renter.
    Question: Is it a thing to mix e-drum kits with acoustic? E.g. I am reading that e-top hats don’t have the same feel, so do people use a e-drum kit but just swap out out the top-hat?

    Sorry if I’m making people cringe with my terminology.

    TIA,

    Mike

    #38125
    Grant
    Keymaster

    Hey Mike!

    Great to hear your thoughts and great questions. These are not “noob” questions, these are super valid and are going to help you be a better drummer once you have some answers.

    What you have heard is correct, electronic drums feel quite different from acoustic drums. However that’s not necessarily a bad thing, they are just very different. Electronic cymbals for instance are not nearly as sensitive as real cymbals, while electronic drum pads can be way more sensitive than actual drums.

    However, combining acoustic and electric drums is actually super common! Especially in the professional world. Drums tend to use acoustic kits, while implementing aspects of electronic drums. For instance, if a drummer is playing for an artist or band, and the artist wants to use claps in the verse instead of a snare drum sound, a drummer can use and electronic drum pad, set it to sound like a clap, and bam the song is very different.

    This is a very fun world to explore and one I would definitely suggest you look into. Feel free to try anything! The worst that can happen is it doesn’t sound like you expected it to, then you’ve just learned another aspect of your craft.

    Lets us know how it goes Mike!

    #38126
    Stephen
    Keymaster

    Hey Mike…yea, as Joshua said, it’s very common to combine them these days. Some people run an ekit with real cymbals…some with real cymbals and a snare, etc. Just depends on your setup and your needs. The great thing about drums is there’s no “wrong”. If it works for your situation, do it. Zildjian also makes the Gen 16 cymbals for e kits that you might want to check out as well.

    #38127
    Grant
    Keymaster

    Great point! The Zildjian Gen 16 are AMAZING. Here’s a link to them demonstrated! CLICK HERE

    The only thing to note about utilizing the Gen 16’s or even the Zildjian L80’s, is there will be a difference in volume when you’re practicing. Electronic drum kit cymbals tend to sound like you are hitting a practice pad, where as the Gen 16’s sound like a real cymbal, just much quieter.

    Just important thoughts to keep in mind if you are in an apartment or townhome!

  • Author
    Posts
  • #38124

    Mike
    Participant
    • Offline

    Hi:

    I’m a n00b, loving SDS, and diligently and patiently practicing on an old e-kit left behind by a renter.
    Question: Is it a thing to mix e-drum kits with acoustic? E.g. I am reading that e-top hats don’t have the same feel, so do people use a e-drum kit but just swap out out the top-hat?

    Sorry if I’m making people cringe with my terminology.

    TIA,

    Mike

    #38125

    Grant
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Hey Mike!

    Great to hear your thoughts and great questions. These are not “noob” questions, these are super valid and are going to help you be a better drummer once you have some answers.

    What you have heard is correct, electronic drums feel quite different from acoustic drums. However that’s not necessarily a bad thing, they are just very different. Electronic cymbals for instance are not nearly as sensitive as real cymbals, while electronic drum pads can be way more sensitive than actual drums.

    However, combining acoustic and electric drums is actually super common! Especially in the professional world. Drums tend to use acoustic kits, while implementing aspects of electronic drums. For instance, if a drummer is playing for an artist or band, and the artist wants to use claps in the verse instead of a snare drum sound, a drummer can use and electronic drum pad, set it to sound like a clap, and bam the song is very different.

    This is a very fun world to explore and one I would definitely suggest you look into. Feel free to try anything! The worst that can happen is it doesn’t sound like you expected it to, then you’ve just learned another aspect of your craft.

    Lets us know how it goes Mike!

    #38126

    Stephen
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Hey Mike…yea, as Joshua said, it’s very common to combine them these days. Some people run an ekit with real cymbals…some with real cymbals and a snare, etc. Just depends on your setup and your needs. The great thing about drums is there’s no “wrong”. If it works for your situation, do it. Zildjian also makes the Gen 16 cymbals for e kits that you might want to check out as well.

    #38127

    Grant
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Great point! The Zildjian Gen 16 are AMAZING. Here’s a link to them demonstrated! CLICK HERE

    The only thing to note about utilizing the Gen 16’s or even the Zildjian L80’s, is there will be a difference in volume when you’re practicing. Electronic drum kit cymbals tend to sound like you are hitting a practice pad, where as the Gen 16’s sound like a real cymbal, just much quieter.

    Just important thoughts to keep in mind if you are in an apartment or townhome!

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