Developing Creativity

Drum Lessons Forums DBD Member Lesson Discussion Developing Creativity

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Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #30113
    Marcus
    Moderator

    It sounded as though this was a common theme. I though maybe we should start a discussion on ways to develop creativity. One thing I like to do is take something I already know and do something different with it. Here is a really simple example. Take a double stroke roll (RRLL…..) and put it on the snare. Play the kick every time the first right hits, play the hi-hat pedal every time the first left hits. Once I have that solid and feeling good, I might move my right hand to the floor tom and keep my right on the snare and “split” the double. Then I might move the left to the high tom. Then alternate the left from floor tom to snare. Anyway, you get the idea. Over time this might develop into a fill or a tom groove etc. What constraints could you see using to develop creativity?

    #30121
    Robert
    Participant

    Same thing here Marcus.  When I really need a creative spark, it tends to work better if I go back to something basic and try to look at it from a different angle.  Sometimes it can be as minor as taking a sticking and just moving the notes around so they are on different parts of the kit.  Even though the pattern is the same, it can cause me to hear it differently.  I’m trying to get the whole chunking concept down so it becomes second nature.  I think chunking with patterns I already know could be a great creative spark.  Thanks for starting this thread.

    #30140
    Marcus
    Moderator

    One of the topics introduced was coming up with original beats.  Sometimes it might not be as much about creating a new beat, but more so how you affect the groove or feel of standard beat.  For example, 18th notes on the ride, 2 and 4 on snare and 1 and 3 on kick.  That is a really standard rock beat, but putting an accent on the 1, 2, 3 and 4 on the ride, or playing those on a different part of the ride or with a different part of the stick can change the feel of the groove.  Playing hi hat with the foot on the up beats completely changes the feel.  So sometimes it isn’t so much about the actual rhythms being played as much as it is how we play those tried and true beats.

    #30152
    Daniel
    Participant

    This idea of “zones” that Stephen talks about and shows us I think is really powerful in terms of creating new sounds with the same basic beat/pattern.  Move hands around the zones in a musical way and your expressing musical creativity.  It’s really cool way to structure what I guess we used to just call “orchestration”.  But, that is a bit fuzzy.  Zones add some more structure.  Zone 1,2,3,4,5.  More well defined. And also you can devise you own zones.  I am into zones now!  :) – dan

    #30155
    Kyle
    Participant

    My way of playing creative is just listening to many drummers and mashing together ideas. One drummer I look at is Stewart Copeland, with how he lands his fills. Obviously, you can take basic fills, and instead of hitting a tom roll, maybe do that and do you roll with the cymbals. I know I’m not explaining that properly haha. I love to accent cymbals in strange ways that wouldn’t usually be done.

    #30247
    Devin
    Participant

    I think I’m most creative when I go and just mess about on the drums for fun. I think its a nice break from learning something specific and just discovering things on your own by random mistakes.

    A cool thing I ended up doing lately is playing a half time shuffle between the left foot and right hand. Its hard but it sounds really cool.

    I wish I knew more drummers in real life to exchange ideas and stuff that would help to.

    #30382
    Aaron
    Participant

    Melodies. Whether they be vocal or instrument lines, they are a pretty cool way to try and interpret them within a beat, a fill, or a solo.

    #30409
    Stephen
    Keymaster

    @Aaron Honestly, this was the ONLY way I thought about things up until I got on the “internet”. Solos were simply constructed around melodies. Chops for the sake of chops just don’t cut it for me. But taking this approach, you have to know that some of the “kids” will not “get it” (using a lot of quotations here lol). But I think it’s our job to pound this in to their heads. Because there are plenty out there pounding other things…sensationalism, chops, setting the drums on fire. All of that is fun…and I love it to a point…but we’re playing music. And there were teachers that stuck to their guns…and players that spent their lives…trying to demonstrate what art and music is on the drums.

    Give me a 3 note melody on the drums over chops any day. Use THAT as your launching pad to create from and make everything else fit around it. Changes everything.

    #30425
    Devin
    Participant

    @Stephen

    Its the only way. i’ve been working on soloing lately and everything sounds so much better if you leave the ego and chops behind, but its really hard to do! Because when you perform it you just know someones going to be judging on how complicated and fast it was.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #30113

    Marcus
    Moderator
    • Offline

    It sounded as though this was a common theme. I though maybe we should start a discussion on ways to develop creativity. One thing I like to do is take something I already know and do something different with it. Here is a really simple example. Take a double stroke roll (RRLL…..) and put it on the snare. Play the kick every time the first right hits, play the hi-hat pedal every time the first left hits. Once I have that solid and feeling good, I might move my right hand to the floor tom and keep my right on the snare and “split” the double. Then I might move the left to the high tom. Then alternate the left from floor tom to snare. Anyway, you get the idea. Over time this might develop into a fill or a tom groove etc. What constraints could you see using to develop creativity?

    #30121

    Robert
    Participant
    • Offline

    Same thing here Marcus.  When I really need a creative spark, it tends to work better if I go back to something basic and try to look at it from a different angle.  Sometimes it can be as minor as taking a sticking and just moving the notes around so they are on different parts of the kit.  Even though the pattern is the same, it can cause me to hear it differently.  I’m trying to get the whole chunking concept down so it becomes second nature.  I think chunking with patterns I already know could be a great creative spark.  Thanks for starting this thread.

    #30140

    Marcus
    Moderator
    • Offline

    One of the topics introduced was coming up with original beats.  Sometimes it might not be as much about creating a new beat, but more so how you affect the groove or feel of standard beat.  For example, 18th notes on the ride, 2 and 4 on snare and 1 and 3 on kick.  That is a really standard rock beat, but putting an accent on the 1, 2, 3 and 4 on the ride, or playing those on a different part of the ride or with a different part of the stick can change the feel of the groove.  Playing hi hat with the foot on the up beats completely changes the feel.  So sometimes it isn’t so much about the actual rhythms being played as much as it is how we play those tried and true beats.

    #30152

    Daniel
    Participant
    • Offline

    This idea of “zones” that Stephen talks about and shows us I think is really powerful in terms of creating new sounds with the same basic beat/pattern.  Move hands around the zones in a musical way and your expressing musical creativity.  It’s really cool way to structure what I guess we used to just call “orchestration”.  But, that is a bit fuzzy.  Zones add some more structure.  Zone 1,2,3,4,5.  More well defined. And also you can devise you own zones.  I am into zones now!  :) – dan

    #30155

    Kyle
    Participant
    • Offline

    My way of playing creative is just listening to many drummers and mashing together ideas. One drummer I look at is Stewart Copeland, with how he lands his fills. Obviously, you can take basic fills, and instead of hitting a tom roll, maybe do that and do you roll with the cymbals. I know I’m not explaining that properly haha. I love to accent cymbals in strange ways that wouldn’t usually be done.

    #30247

    Devin
    Participant
    • Offline

    I think I’m most creative when I go and just mess about on the drums for fun. I think its a nice break from learning something specific and just discovering things on your own by random mistakes.

    A cool thing I ended up doing lately is playing a half time shuffle between the left foot and right hand. Its hard but it sounds really cool.

    I wish I knew more drummers in real life to exchange ideas and stuff that would help to.

    #30382

    Aaron
    Participant
    • Offline

    Melodies. Whether they be vocal or instrument lines, they are a pretty cool way to try and interpret them within a beat, a fill, or a solo.

    #30409

    Stephen
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    @Aaron Honestly, this was the ONLY way I thought about things up until I got on the “internet”. Solos were simply constructed around melodies. Chops for the sake of chops just don’t cut it for me. But taking this approach, you have to know that some of the “kids” will not “get it” (using a lot of quotations here lol). But I think it’s our job to pound this in to their heads. Because there are plenty out there pounding other things…sensationalism, chops, setting the drums on fire. All of that is fun…and I love it to a point…but we’re playing music. And there were teachers that stuck to their guns…and players that spent their lives…trying to demonstrate what art and music is on the drums.

    Give me a 3 note melody on the drums over chops any day. Use THAT as your launching pad to create from and make everything else fit around it. Changes everything.

    #30425

    Devin
    Participant
    • Offline

    @Stephen

    Its the only way. i’ve been working on soloing lately and everything sounds so much better if you leave the ego and chops behind, but its really hard to do! Because when you perform it you just know someones going to be judging on how complicated and fast it was.

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