CYMBALS

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
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    Posts
  • #35955
    Grant
    Keymaster

    Hey ya’ll!!

    I’m in the market for some new cymbals and wanted to hear what you guys think I should get. I definitely prefer big, dark and washy cymbals. I love that sound, but I definitely need a few that are a bit more versatile.

    Anybody have any good suggestions? Hats, crashes, rides everything! Let me know what you think in the comments below.

    #35970
    Dieter
    Participant

    Hello from germany,
    I’ll try my best in english writing….
    First: never buy a cymbale,that yöu havn’t heared live by yourself.
    Split your cymbales into set’s for different kind off music… like jazz, rock ore other styles.
    Start with the HiHat-Set, than take them with you to the store to get a good compatibile ride cymbale.
    As you prefer darker cymbales, think about the bandsound playing live, YOU the one that drives the beat with your ride ping.
    Most of the time it takes a clearer ping to cut thru with the rides ping if the band play’s all together at once.
    Take care about the wash-tone spectrum of the ride when you get the crashes. If the wash of the ride starts to acure to soon
    when you drive it and you add the wash of the crash you wont have a chance to get a devined sound.
    So that’s just a short comment of mine, just think…so more you ask…the more you can get confused.
    There is no roule of manifested …the only right statement.
    Good luck
    Dieter

    #35991
    Grant
    Keymaster

    Hey Dieter!!

    Thanks so much for the advice, it sounds like you’ve got some experience backing up your ideas. I’ve actually never taken cymbals into a drum shop to find something that compliments them. That’s a great idea!

    #35993
    Dieter
    Participant

    Hello keymaster,
    well I’m what some people would call a freak about cymbales and I play drums since about 55 years.
    There are a lot more of parameters witch are important about chosing cymbales.
    Have an ear on their volume responce between eachother
    For a live gig without microphones you would have to take care of other sound parameters then in a studio recording session.
    I own different cymbale sets from Zyldjian, Meinl and Paiste and the most of them are originale old once from the fourtys up to the sixtees. I bought them in the USA.
    It is possibile to mix those but as an example:
    Paiste usually punches the body of the cymbale out of an big piece alloy before they get hammered.
    This technique ensures a constant consistence and basic sounding of one product series of the cymbales body.
    Zyldjians cymbales  in official tradition are usually not made this way.
    Here is a link, in case that you would like to get some information about important marks of Zyldjian cymbales:
    http://www.hidehitters.com/cymbals/Zildjianstamps/timeline.html
    There is also a big different opinion about cleaning cymbales ore leave their patina on them.
    I see it this way: during the production process they dont have a patina and the person that works on lathing and hammering
    is listening how his working effects the cymbale to creat his favored sound. Over years the cymbale get’s a patina, but after years the human ear will be unable to remember how the cymbale used to sound when it whas new.
    I made the experience that after cleaning a cymbale that it sound clearer in the high frequencys than before cleaning and it softens
    the transission between the ping and the wash. This sounding parameter gets a smother flow again.
    well… and so on…
    wish you sucess with chosing your new cymbales, listing to your emotions when you hit a cymbale!!!
    Hello from germany
    Dieter

    #35995
    Grant
    Keymaster

    That all sounds great Dieter!! Thank you so much for all the information and advice. I will be sure to keep all that in mind when I continue looking for my new cymbals. I’ll let you know what I end up buying!!! Hope all is well in Germany!

    #35996
    Dave
    Participant

    Agree with Dieter!  Bringing parts of your current setup to the shop is a sure-shot way to make sure you like to final set-up.  For starting points though, I’ve always gone to Zildjian K’s for dark & washy…but I have also met/heard from many drummers that it was Meinl changed the game for them in terms of getting dark warmer cymbal tones.

     

    I’ve also found that if you want to compare cymbal brands/series to narrow down what you want to look at once you get to the store, just search the cymbal on Youtube and there will 99.999% of the time be a HD demo video from Memphis Drum shop.

     

    Good luck!! Post pics of your setup when you’re done!

    #35999
    Grant
    Keymaster

    Thanks for the input Dave!! I sure will, I appreciate the help!

    #36121
    John-Olav
    Participant

    Cymbals are super difficult. And most of us don’t have the option to go to a store to check out cymbals. Even in the big cities of Norway the music stores usually don’t have what I’m looking for anyways. But online stores will usually let you return a cymbal if you’re not happy with it.

    I play in small locations, typical churches and such. No mics and I have to keep volume down. So my whole setup is build with the idea of a warm, dark nice sound. I have Heartbeat cymbals. They are traditionally made Turkish cymbals, specially made with the purpose of working well in churches and other places where volume is an issue. They are generally thin, large and dark and that makes them more pleasant to listen to. I actually bought a Meinl Extra dry thin crash, but I had to sell it, because it was louder than my other cymbals.

    If I should look for alternatives, it would have to be something like Istanbul Agop, Bosphorus or similar thin and dark.

    #36124
    Grant
    Keymaster

    Hey John-Olav!!

    Thanks so much for your thoughts on the subject. I actually have quite a few friends who play Heartbeat cymbals in church, and they love them. They’re definitely built for that environment. They’re not harsh, or too dry or bright. Just super solid, buttery cymbals. Glad you were able to get your hands on some!

    #36595
    CANDICE
    Participant

    Hi there,

    I am still what I would call a beginner, I have been taking lessons for awhile now, but based on Stephen’s direction and the ‘setting up your kit’ lesson I moved everything around. I am pretty comfortable with everything except setting up my hi-hats. I have a Zildjian 14″ set. I have the pedal right where it feels comfortable, but I feel like I need to reach to hit the the cymbal on the face. I really don’t know what needs to be done. I cannot move the stand any closer or the pedal will be too close. Thanks for any advice.

    #36596
    Grant
    Keymaster

    Hey Candy!!

    It’s great to hear from you! I hope the DBD program is going well for you and you are diving on into the lessons! I can definitely relate to finding a comfortable setup. It sounds like you possibly need to rase or lower the hi-hats themselves so you can reach them a bit better. Do you mind sharing a picture so we can offer some more accurate advice? Thanks Candy!!

    #36610
    CANDICE
    Participant

    Hi Joshua,

    Thanks for taking a look. Here are a few pics.

    #36620
    John-Olav
    Participant

    Have you tried  just moving the hi-hat a bit closer to the snare and the kick a little further to the right?

    #36623
    Grant
    Keymaster

    John has a good point…adjusting just a bit may be very helpful. I’ll get Stephen involved and hear what he thinks!!

    #37013
    Justin
    Participant

    Hi Candy, did you get this worked out? Hard to tell from the pics, Stephen does discuss drum kit set up in the first couple lesson. Just looking at the side pic, looks as if the hats are to high. Every set up is different here is a pic of my kit.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 7 months ago by Justin.
  • Author
    Posts
  • #35955

    Grant
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Hey ya’ll!!

    I’m in the market for some new cymbals and wanted to hear what you guys think I should get. I definitely prefer big, dark and washy cymbals. I love that sound, but I definitely need a few that are a bit more versatile.

    Anybody have any good suggestions? Hats, crashes, rides everything! Let me know what you think in the comments below.

    #35970

    Dieter
    Participant
    • Offline

    Hello from germany,
    I’ll try my best in english writing….
    First: never buy a cymbale,that yöu havn’t heared live by yourself.
    Split your cymbales into set’s for different kind off music… like jazz, rock ore other styles.
    Start with the HiHat-Set, than take them with you to the store to get a good compatibile ride cymbale.
    As you prefer darker cymbales, think about the bandsound playing live, YOU the one that drives the beat with your ride ping.
    Most of the time it takes a clearer ping to cut thru with the rides ping if the band play’s all together at once.
    Take care about the wash-tone spectrum of the ride when you get the crashes. If the wash of the ride starts to acure to soon
    when you drive it and you add the wash of the crash you wont have a chance to get a devined sound.
    So that’s just a short comment of mine, just think…so more you ask…the more you can get confused.
    There is no roule of manifested …the only right statement.
    Good luck
    Dieter

    #35991

    Grant
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Hey Dieter!!

    Thanks so much for the advice, it sounds like you’ve got some experience backing up your ideas. I’ve actually never taken cymbals into a drum shop to find something that compliments them. That’s a great idea!

    #35993

    Dieter
    Participant
    • Offline

    Hello keymaster,
    well I’m what some people would call a freak about cymbales and I play drums since about 55 years.
    There are a lot more of parameters witch are important about chosing cymbales.
    Have an ear on their volume responce between eachother
    For a live gig without microphones you would have to take care of other sound parameters then in a studio recording session.
    I own different cymbale sets from Zyldjian, Meinl and Paiste and the most of them are originale old once from the fourtys up to the sixtees. I bought them in the USA.
    It is possibile to mix those but as an example:
    Paiste usually punches the body of the cymbale out of an big piece alloy before they get hammered.
    This technique ensures a constant consistence and basic sounding of one product series of the cymbales body.
    Zyldjians cymbales  in official tradition are usually not made this way.
    Here is a link, in case that you would like to get some information about important marks of Zyldjian cymbales:
    http://www.hidehitters.com/cymbals/Zildjianstamps/timeline.html
    There is also a big different opinion about cleaning cymbales ore leave their patina on them.
    I see it this way: during the production process they dont have a patina and the person that works on lathing and hammering
    is listening how his working effects the cymbale to creat his favored sound. Over years the cymbale get’s a patina, but after years the human ear will be unable to remember how the cymbale used to sound when it whas new.
    I made the experience that after cleaning a cymbale that it sound clearer in the high frequencys than before cleaning and it softens
    the transission between the ping and the wash. This sounding parameter gets a smother flow again.
    well… and so on…
    wish you sucess with chosing your new cymbales, listing to your emotions when you hit a cymbale!!!
    Hello from germany
    Dieter

    #35995

    Grant
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    That all sounds great Dieter!! Thank you so much for all the information and advice. I will be sure to keep all that in mind when I continue looking for my new cymbals. I’ll let you know what I end up buying!!! Hope all is well in Germany!

    #35996

    Dave
    Participant
    • Offline

    Agree with Dieter!  Bringing parts of your current setup to the shop is a sure-shot way to make sure you like to final set-up.  For starting points though, I’ve always gone to Zildjian K’s for dark & washy…but I have also met/heard from many drummers that it was Meinl changed the game for them in terms of getting dark warmer cymbal tones.

     

    I’ve also found that if you want to compare cymbal brands/series to narrow down what you want to look at once you get to the store, just search the cymbal on Youtube and there will 99.999% of the time be a HD demo video from Memphis Drum shop.

     

    Good luck!! Post pics of your setup when you’re done!

    #35999

    Grant
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Thanks for the input Dave!! I sure will, I appreciate the help!

    #36121

    John-Olav
    Participant
    • Offline

    Cymbals are super difficult. And most of us don’t have the option to go to a store to check out cymbals. Even in the big cities of Norway the music stores usually don’t have what I’m looking for anyways. But online stores will usually let you return a cymbal if you’re not happy with it.

    I play in small locations, typical churches and such. No mics and I have to keep volume down. So my whole setup is build with the idea of a warm, dark nice sound. I have Heartbeat cymbals. They are traditionally made Turkish cymbals, specially made with the purpose of working well in churches and other places where volume is an issue. They are generally thin, large and dark and that makes them more pleasant to listen to. I actually bought a Meinl Extra dry thin crash, but I had to sell it, because it was louder than my other cymbals.

    If I should look for alternatives, it would have to be something like Istanbul Agop, Bosphorus or similar thin and dark.

    #36124

    Grant
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Hey John-Olav!!

    Thanks so much for your thoughts on the subject. I actually have quite a few friends who play Heartbeat cymbals in church, and they love them. They’re definitely built for that environment. They’re not harsh, or too dry or bright. Just super solid, buttery cymbals. Glad you were able to get your hands on some!

    #36595

    CANDICE
    Participant
    • Offline

    Hi there,

    I am still what I would call a beginner, I have been taking lessons for awhile now, but based on Stephen’s direction and the ‘setting up your kit’ lesson I moved everything around. I am pretty comfortable with everything except setting up my hi-hats. I have a Zildjian 14″ set. I have the pedal right where it feels comfortable, but I feel like I need to reach to hit the the cymbal on the face. I really don’t know what needs to be done. I cannot move the stand any closer or the pedal will be too close. Thanks for any advice.

    #36596

    Grant
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Hey Candy!!

    It’s great to hear from you! I hope the DBD program is going well for you and you are diving on into the lessons! I can definitely relate to finding a comfortable setup. It sounds like you possibly need to rase or lower the hi-hats themselves so you can reach them a bit better. Do you mind sharing a picture so we can offer some more accurate advice? Thanks Candy!!

    #36610

    CANDICE
    Participant
    • Offline

    Hi Joshua,

    Thanks for taking a look. Here are a few pics.

    #36620

    John-Olav
    Participant
    • Offline

    Have you tried  just moving the hi-hat a bit closer to the snare and the kick a little further to the right?

    #36623

    Grant
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    John has a good point…adjusting just a bit may be very helpful. I’ll get Stephen involved and hear what he thinks!!

    #37013

    Justin
    Participant
    • Offline

    Hi Candy, did you get this worked out? Hard to tell from the pics, Stephen does discuss drum kit set up in the first couple lesson. Just looking at the side pic, looks as if the hats are to high. Every set up is different here is a pic of my kit.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 7 months ago by Justin.
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